THE DIARY OF HARRY B. CLEVELAND

APRIL 1900

SUNDAY, APRIL 1, 1900 - Clear and much warmer, although the wind is still strong and strikes one chillily. John N- and I rode about five miles awheel this morning. The first ride I have taken since last fall. Did not dare ride further for fear of stiff joints tomorrow. It is better to begin slowly. Twenty five mile rides will soon be but play. Ice and snow still mantles the hills hereabouts and it will take much sun or warm rain to remove it.

NO ENTRY: APR 2

TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 1900 - Cold and raw. Snow flurries toward night.
Nellie and I went to see the "Princess Chic" tonight. It was far and away the best production of comic opera given here in a very long time. The cast was of unusual ex- cellence vocally and histrionically and the chorus superb. The music alloted to the latter was of a high order; that given the principals was not as good. Libretto, mediocre.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4, 1900 - Cold and windy. Clearing at night. Anxiously awaiting the first real Spring day-- one with the temperature 60 or above. We have enjoyed none such as yet.
Mrs. Edward A. Jones died very suddenly of heart disease 5:00 P.M. today. She was a bride of less than ten months, and her hidden disease will be an awful blow to Ed., whose married life had only just begun. Surely, the ways of Providence are unscrutable.

THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 1900 - Played cards at Sackett's coming away about ten thirty. Still cold and windy.

NO ENTRY: APR 6

SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1900 - Cold and fierce N.W. wind blowing, stirring up an insufferable dust. We are sorely in need of a warm rain.

SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 1900 - Still cold and windy. The air filled with a stifling dust. Took a five or six mile walk today. Too much wind for wheeling.

MONDAY, APRIL 9, 1900 - Very cold morning for this time of year. Thermometer at 7 A.M. 25 above. Snow flurries in the afternoon and a high wind. Walked to the Heights and back this afternoon.

TUESDAY, APRIL 10, 1900 - Considerable snow on the ground this morning. Snow flurries at intervals during the day. Rain is promised for tomorrow, but it will have to moderate materially before that can happen.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 1900 - Somewhat warmer, the thermometer registering slightly above 50. A cool south wind has blown most of the day and at night it has begun to rain. I hope sufficient rain will fall to remove the snow in the woods hereabouts. Rode up the Water Street Cinder path been eleven and twelve today; found it rough and sticky. This is the first ride I have taken outside the city limits this Spring.

THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1900 - The Porto Rican tariff bill passed the house yesterday 181-173. It is a measure utterly opposed to the teachings of the Nation's founders and I believe very vicious. The President was obliged to make a complete change of front in order to give it his signature and in doing so, many think he signed his political death warrent. A few months will tell.

FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 1900 - Awoke this morning to find the ground covered with about an inch of snow and it was still coming down plentifully. Cleared shortly after noon for about an hour, then clouded up again and toward night rained quite hard. I have no recollection of a more backward Spring. Nothing except an occasional patch shows the slightest signs of life. An occasional robin and song sparrow.

SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1900 - Clear and windy; a trifle warmer than yesterday, but too cool for all that.
The Paris Exposition opened today with elaborate ceremony. Said to be more truly represenatative of all countries than the Chicago Fair, but not as imposing. Hardly complete as yet.

SUNDAY, APRIL 15, 1900 - Easter. A truly glorious day. The thermometer above 60 and a bright sun. Neglected to go to Church, sinner that I am; but instead went wheeling up the cinder path towards Big Flats. Everything looks grey and lifeless as yet. Occasional patches of snow could be seen on the hills. Rode about 22 miles before returning home. The fresh air did me good.

MONDAY, APRIL 16, 1900 - Clear and warm (ther. 68) most of the day. Clouded up toward night and looked threatening. A good warm rain will work wonders with vegetation. I hear Trailing Arbutus can be found now. Must try and gather some soon. In season it is very plentiful just above Fitch's Bridge on the flats lying near the river

TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 1900 - My 32nd birthday. Dark and stormy. I hope that is no augering for the coming year. Received Mitchell's "American Lands and Letters" from Nellie and Tolstoy's "Ressurection" from my Mother, as gifts of rememberance.
The warm rain has started the grass and in many places it has taken on a pronounced green.
Senator Hoar delivers a masterly arrangement of imperialism in the Senate today.

NO ENTRIES: APR 18 AND APR 19

FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 1900 - A perfect day; mild and bright. The lawns are commencing to look quite summery.
Rode down to the Maple Avenue Park before supper. Work upon the base ball diamond is progressing rapidly and they will soon have everything perfection. Manager Smith is assembling a good club and I look for some rare sport. The effort to play Sunday games, however, I consider a lamentable mistake.

SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 1900 - Warm and bright in morning there above 70. Cloudy and threatening in the afternoon. Heavy rain at night, which will rush all growing things.
Spent the evening at Sackett's. Got "walloped" at pedro. Our luck seems to have deserted us. Only got 3 games out of 11 and they are now 18 games ahead on the season.

SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1900 - Warm and cloudy in morning; clearing at noon, and sultry in the afternoon, with a sharp thunder shower between four and five.
The Elmira Base Ball Club attempted to play this afternoon and were arrested after one inning. All were held under bail until Friday when they will be given a jury trial. It is to be hoped Sunday games will be prohibited.

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 1900 - Partly cloudy and threatening during most of the day. Much cooler at night when a sharp north wind sprang up.
Nothing of interest to record today.

TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 1900 - Clear and bright with a cold north wind. Vegetation is coming on very slowly being much behind last year.
Passed part of the evening at the Library and the balance at home. Brought home Emerson's "Society & Solitude". I have his essay's first and second series, and have always found the most pronounced pleasure in reading them; finding something new at each perusal.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1900 - Cold north wind still continues although the days continue bright. There is too much of the breath of Winter however to render it enjoyable out of doors. Bicycle rides after supper are tabooes until it grows much milder.

NO ENTRY: APR 26

FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1900 - Cold blustery north winds still prevail. The air has been filled with dust all day, ditto my eyes. The wind fairly stood one still crossing the bridge, and I made my way to the office under difficulties.
The jury trying the Elmira Baseball Club for violation of the statutes in playing ball last Sunday rendered a verdict of "Not Guilty". Out 6 minutes.

SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 1900 - Somewhat warmer but still too cool for comfort, and the penetrating north wind still holds undisputed sway. Suffering from a disagreeable and lingering cold in my head. Cannot seem to rid myself of it. No fruit trees in blossom yet although last year the 27th saw one of ours in blossom and we considered that a cold Spring.

SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1900 - Very warm and summer-like the thermometer reaching 80 at 3 P.M. Walked over to Theo. Kolbs and enjoyed a visit with him and his wife. He starts South this coming week to accept a position with a smokeless powder concern. Spent the evening with Nellie. A brush fire on East Hill presented a beautiful sight after it became dark. The air was filled with the scent of burning wood.

MONDAY, APRIL 30, 1900 - Warm in the morning, clearing at noon or shortly after and much cooler. The brisk wind has cleared the atmosphere of smoke quite thoroughly. The sun-set tonight was molten gold without a cloud. Sharp frost liable. Mr. Benjamin is busy moving and I have been alone at the office all day.


CONTINUE

Copyright 1999 Peter Haskell